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LIZ DREIER | Should Old Acquaintance Be Forgot?

Mr. 2020 long outstayed his welcome (That’s right. I refer to it as “him” because a woman wouldn’t do us like that.). My thoughts began to meander in the direction of wondering what kind of farewell message people might have for our ungrateful guest.
Liz Dreier Column 08312020
Liz Dreier

Like most people, I was looking forward to one minute after midnight on New Year’s Eve. 

The past year has been described as “horrific,” “a train wreck," “a dumpster fire" and “a nightmare.”

There were wildfires in California and Australia. Meghan and Harry left the Royal Family with nary a backward glance. There were sex scandals, the pandemic, civil unrest, the deaths of beloved public figures and a nasty election, not to mention UFOs and murder hornets.

Mr. 2020 long outstayed his welcome (That’s right. I refer to it as “him” because a woman wouldn’t do us like that.). My thoughts began to meander in the direction of wondering what kind of farewell message people might have for our ungrateful guest.

Following are the results of my informal survey titled “Should Old Acquaintance Be Forgot? Yes!”

• “I am glad 2020 is in our hindsight. Here is hoping the rest of the 20s is SO MUCH BETTER!!” Llita from Boardman.

• “This has been the longest year of my life with four (family members) almost having it. (Had to quarantine anyway. I’m waiting for the shot.) I think this year took five years off my life.” — Cheryl, West Virginia.

• “A challenge with curses and blessings.” — Linda, Youngstown.

• “If only they had called it the “stay-at-home” challenge instead of “lockdown” or “quarantine” and posted it on Facebook, COVID-19 would no longer exist.” Mischelle, Youngstown.

• “2020, you have offered us both blessings and harshness. Our new home and car are joyful additions we acquired this year.  Our family is grateful to be essential employees and maintain our jobs.  It is wonderful to be a part of the field of nursing to which so much love and appreciation have been extended to our discipline this year, although the cost was incredibly high. 2020, I am happy to see you go, although you were certainly eventful.” Jenn, West Virginia.

• “It’s been a long year living through the next change of history my children will most likely read about in books.”  Kate, Port Clinton.

“We will not sadly say goodbye to sickness, sorrow, unemployment, fear for front line workers, including family, disrespect to police, and the crazy election.  I will gladly look back and smile at new ways of teaching, doing things I had time to do, trying new crafts, and getting cozy with my dear household.” — Laurie, Columbiana.

• “2020 allowed me to save more money by not going out as much.” — Chris from Pennsylvania.

• “Goodbye, 2020. The year that has taught me so much about what is important in life. People are more important than possessions. We have a long way to go to measure up to the Greatest Generation, who believed in sacrifice for a common good. And finally, the proper way to wash my hands!” Judie from Texas.

What’s my farewell message to 2020?  "So long, it’s NOT been good to know you — and don’t let the celestial door hit you on the way out."