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YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS | You have the right to remain silent. Use it!

After watching Lenny Briscoe “Mirandize” a couple of thousand criminals, people think they understand what the warning means. Believe me, they do not because this area of the law, like most, is extremely complicated.
davidbetras032020
Attorney David Betras

If you have viewed “Law and Order,” “Law and Order SVU,” “Law and Order Organized Crime,” “Law and Order LA,” “Law and Order Def Comedy Jam” or one of the dozen or so other iterations of the franchise, you have undoubtedly heard a cop recite the following to a suspect as they slap on the cuffs:

You have the right to remain silent.
Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law
You have the right to talk to a lawyer and have him or her present while you are being questioned.
If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to represent you before any questioning if you wish.
You can decide at any time to exercise these rights and not answer any questions or make any statements.
Do you understand each of these rights I have explained to you? Having these rights in mind, do you wish to talk to us now?

Just a hint: the answer to the last question is always “no.” I will expand on this point shortly.

After watching Lenny Briscoe “Mirandize” a couple of thousand criminals, people think they understand what the warning means. Believe me, they do not because this area of the law, like most, is extremely complicated. And that explains why 90% of criminal cases are solved when people who think they know their rights tell on themselves. 

For starters, according to the Supreme Court’s 1966 ruling in Miranda v. Arizona, law enforcement officers do not have to issue a Miranda warning unless they are conducting a custodial interrogation. In plain English, that means suspects do not have to be advised of their right to keep their yap shut unless and until they have been deprived of their freedom of action in a significant way.

In light of this fact, police officers often delay placing a suspect in custody and tell them they are free to go. They then begin asking questions that can lead to an arrest. For example, a police officer stops a driver who is swerving and asks, “Have you had anything to drink tonight?” More often than I care to remember, the driver, who I am almost invariably standing next to in front of a judge, will answer, “Well, I’ve had a couple of beers,” as if the officer will be satisfied by the qualifier “couple of beers” and will then happily send the driver on his or her way with a friendly wave.

Uhm, not so much. At that point, the officer, who was not required to issue a Miranda warning when he posed what amounts to the $10,000 dollar or so question, will ask the driver to exit the car, submit to a field sobriety test and then a breathalyzer exam. At the end of the process, the driver will be arrested and Mirandized — which does not mean much at that point.

So, here are the takeaways from this week’s column: 

First,  if you are stopped by law enforcement and questioned you are under no obligation to do anything other than provide your name and ID. 

Second, remember, the police will delay placing you in custody so they can use what you say to establish probable cause for arrest.

Third, your pre-arrest statements are admissible in court.  

Fourth: Shut up. What you do not say cannot be used against you.

—  Attorney David Betras, a senior partner at Betras, Kopp & Harshman LLC., directs the firm’s non-litigation activities and practices criminal defense law in both the state and federal courts. He has practiced law for 35 years. Have a legal question you'd like answered here? Send it to news@mahoningmatters.com.



 
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