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Brown rolls to second term as Youngstown mayor

Incumbent Youngstown Mayor Jamael Tito Brown, a Democrat, received more than 60% of the total vote in Tuesday's election.
Mayor Jamael Tito Brown Profile 04232021
Youngstown Mayor Jamael Tito Brown, candidate for reelection. (William D, Lewis | Mahoning Matters)

YOUNGSTOWN — Among a field of nine candidates for Youngstown mayor, including six write-ins, incumbent Jamael Tito Brown on Tuesday earned his second term by drawing more than three-fifths of the overall vote.

Brown, a Democrat, received 60.2% of the vote (4,680 votes), according to unofficial results from the Mahoning County Board of Elections.

Brown did not return calls for comment Tuesday night.

Republican challenger Tracey Winbush, a longtime local political activist, received 17.1% of the vote (1,332 votes).

Winbush said though she was disappointed with the results, she hopes Brown will, simply put: “lead.”

“I just pray that Youngstown gets what it wants; what it needs. Because if it keeps on the road that it’s going on, the end doesn’t look good,” she told Mahoning Matters.

“I ran a good race. It is what it is. Hopefully, Youngstown will win because it’s really not about personalities — it’s truly about people.”

Richard Vincent Hill, a business owner and city courts supervisor who ran as an independent candidate, received 10.7% of the vote (830 votes).

Hill congratulated Brown on “a good campaign.”

“I’m not going anywhere. I’m still committed to the community,” Hill told Mahoning Matters. “It was my first time running and I learned a lot from the experience.

“I’m just going to keep moving forward with the community.”

The six write-in candidates for Youngstown mayor received a combined 12 percent of the vote (931 votes). Those candidates included: Calvin Hill; Cecil B. Monroe; Claudette R. Moore; Tayana C. Smith; Lynette Wesley; and Amber Leigh White.

Of the more than 163,000 registered voters in Mahoning County, 40,620 cast ballots in Tuesday's general election — a turnout rate of just under 25%, according to the elections board.



Justin Dennis

About the Author: Justin Dennis

Justin Dennis has been on the beat since 2011, covering crime, courts and public education. Dennis grew up in Poland and Salem and studied journalism and communications at Cleveland State University and University of Pittsburgh.
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