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Valley reacts to tentative UAW, GM agreement

Unknown yet is a definitive determination of the GM Lordstown plant, which closed in March after the company put it on "unallocated" status after the end of the domestically-built Chevy Cruze. 

DETROIT — The United Automobile Workers union today delivered a proposal to end the month-long General Motors strike.

UAW GM Vice President Terry Dittes announced in a Wednesday release negotiators for the union and GM have reached a proposed tentative agreement which will be sent to the UAW GM National Council for approval.

“The number one priority of the national negotiation team has been to secure a strong and fair contract that our members deserve,” Dittes said. "Out of respect for our members, we will refrain from commenting on the details until the UAW GM leaders gather together and receive all details.”

Unknown yet is a definitive determination of the GM Lordstown plant, which closed in March after the company put it on "unallocated" status after the end of the domestically built Chevy Cruze. 

A UAW-GM council meeting is set for Thursday morning in Detroit, where officials will discuss the contract update.

“We are extremely grateful to the thousands of Americans who donated goods and helped our striking workers and their families. As we await the Council’s decision, please know that the outpouring of community and national support will be etched in the memories of all of us at the UAW for years to come,” Dittes said.

Lordstown Mayor Arno Hill told Mahoning Matters this afternoon though a new GM product at GM's Lordstown Assembly Complex would be the ideal outcome, there's still uncertainty over "whether that's going to happen or not."

He said he's waiting to see what comes out of Thursday's council meeting.

"We still want to have a GM presence in the Valley. As far as Workhorse, we're wondering where the funding's going to be coming for that," he said. "There's too many unknowns right now.

"If General Motors is definitely going to look at Workhorse, I guess we'll have to come to the table and talk to them."

Similarly, UAW Local 1112 VP Bill Adams said the hall is "just holding out hope" the new agreement would bring the Lordstown plant back online.

If not, Adams added the fate of the hall would be "up in the air."

The strike — which is the longest since 1970, stopping work at more than 30 GM facilities nationwide — will continue until the council confirms the agreement and the union votes to ratify, according to the Wall Street Journal.